Sandya Mannarswamy
Question time!

CodeSport (November 2010)

Welcome to CodeSport! In this column, we provide the solutions to a few of the questions we had featured last month. Last month’s column featured solutions to a medley of questions on computer…

Programming questions

CodeSport (October 2010)

Welcome to CodeSport. Here are some of the solutions to questions we raised in last month’s column. My last column featured a medley of questions on computer architecture, operating systems and algorithms. Congratulations…

Question bank

CodeSport (September 2010)

Welcome to CodeSport. This month, we feature a medley of questions about operating systems, computer architecture and algorithms. Last month’s column featured three questions on mutual exclusion, the memory consistency model and synchronisation….

CodeSport (September 2009)

Welcome to another instalment of CodeSport. In this month’s column, we continue our discussion on the false sharing issue in multi-threaded applications. We’ll also discuss priority inversion and possible techniques to deal with it.

CodeSport (May 2009)

This month we take a quick look at the problem of finding out whether a given binary tree is in fact a binary search tree. We then discuss the problem of finding the maximum and minimum in a binary search tree.

CodeSport (March 2009)

In this month’s column, we’ll explore the best lower bounds of algorithms to determine whether a given graph is connected or not. We will then discuss the problem of finding the minimum element in a circular sorted linked list, given an arbitrary pointer into the list.

CodeSport (February 2009)

This month’s column focuses on computational complexity and the lower bounds for algorithms. In particular, we’ll show that any algorithm to find the maximum in an array of N elements has a lower bound of O(N) by using an adversary argument.

CodeSport (January 2009)

Welcome to another installment of CodeSport, which focuses on number theoretic algorithms. In particular, we will discuss the well-known 3-SUM problem, where given an array A of N numbers, we need to determine whether there exists a triple a, b and c that belongs to A, such that a+b+c = 0.

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